UW-Madison, Medical College lead round two winners of Foxconn contest

Mobility, energy and environment top areas of interest

Foxconn Technology Group announced 30 winners in the second round of its Smart Cities, Smart Futures competition on Wednesday.

A model of the Foxconn complex, called the Wisconn Valley Science and Technology Park, in Mount Pleasant.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison led all schools with seven winning entries. The Medical College of Wisconsin was second with six winners, followed by UW-Milwaukee with five and UW-Platteville at four. Other schools represented included Carroll University, Concordia University, UW-Eau Claire, Gateway Technical College, UW-Green Bay, Milwaukee School of Engineering and UW-Whitewater.

Seven of the winning entries fell in the mobility and transportation category, the most of an area. Energy and the environment was second with five winners and the augmented, virtual and mixed reality and internet of things categories tied for third with four winners each. Other categories represented in the second round winners included artificial intelligence, e-health, education, food and sensors.

The 30 winners came from a pool of 88 first round winners. The second round winners each receive $1,500 to further develop their projects.

“The “Smart Cities—Smart Futures” competition has become a driving force for creating novel ideas that could help improve people’s lives in terms of work, travel, leisure, and health,” said Alan Yeung, director of U.S. strategic initiatives for Foxconn. “As we endeavor to create an ecosystem of innovation here in Wisconsin, these submissions show us how creative thinking and technology can benefit our communities.”

The third round of the competition will run through the end of April and up to 16 winners will receive $5,000 and technical support to develop and implement their ideas. A panel of 50 judges will evaluate entries based on clarity, impact, marketability and other criteria.

Foxconn announced the Smart Cities, Smart Futures initiative last year. The company committed $1 million in cash and prizes to the contest over three years.

Foxconn Technology Group announced 30 winners in the second round of its Smart Cities, Smart Futures competition on Wednesday.

A model of the Foxconn complex, called the Wisconn Valley Science and Technology Park, in Mount Pleasant.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison led all schools with seven winning entries. The Medical College of Wisconsin was second with six winners, followed by UW-Milwaukee with five and UW-Platteville at four. Other schools represented included Carroll University, Concordia University, UW-Eau Claire, Gateway Technical College, UW-Green Bay, Milwaukee School of Engineering and UW-Whitewater.

Seven of the winning entries fell in the mobility and transportation category, the most of an area. Energy and the environment was second with five winners and the augmented, virtual and mixed reality and internet of things categories tied for third with four winners each. Other categories represented in the second round winners included artificial intelligence, e-health, education, food and sensors.

The 30 winners came from a pool of 88 first round winners. The second round winners each receive $1,500 to further develop their projects.

“The “Smart Cities—Smart Futures” competition has become a driving force for creating novel ideas that could help improve people’s lives in terms of work, travel, leisure, and health,” said Alan Yeung, director of U.S. strategic initiatives for Foxconn. “As we endeavor to create an ecosystem of innovation here in Wisconsin, these submissions show us how creative thinking and technology can benefit our communities.”

The third round of the competition will run through the end of April and up to 16 winners will receive $5,000 and technical support to develop and implement their ideas. A panel of 50 judges will evaluate entries based on clarity, impact, marketability and other criteria.

Foxconn announced the Smart Cities, Smart Futures initiative last year. The company committed $1 million in cash and prizes to the contest over three years.

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