Four-story apartment building planned on city’s East Side

Will replace two duplexes south of former Judge's bar

A West Bend development team is planning to deconstruct two duplexes on Milwaukee’s East Side and replace them with a four-story, 36-unit apartment building.

The $4 million project, called Cambridge North, located at 2075 N. Cambridge Ave., just south of the former Judge’s bar, is expected to begin within the next month.

It is being led by Metro Realty Group LLC and American Architectural Group, both based in West Bend.

The project will include a mix of studio, one and two-bedroom apartments, said Adam Hertel, an architect with American Architectural Group.

“We are planning to have an up-to-date style and color scheme that will cater not only to students, but people working in the area as well,” Hertel said. “There is a lot happening on the East Side so we don’t want this to be exclusive to students.”

The project will have a private, gated surface parking lot and indoor and outdoor bicycle storage.

The materials from the deconstructed homes will be donated to local non-profits including Habitat for Humanity, Hertel said.

 

A West Bend development team is planning to deconstruct two duplexes on Milwaukee’s East Side and replace them with a four-story, 36-unit apartment building.

The $4 million project, called Cambridge North, located at 2075 N. Cambridge Ave., just south of the former Judge’s bar, is expected to begin within the next month.

It is being led by Metro Realty Group LLC and American Architectural Group, both based in West Bend.

The project will include a mix of studio, one and two-bedroom apartments, said Adam Hertel, an architect with American Architectural Group.

“We are planning to have an up-to-date style and color scheme that will cater not only to students, but people working in the area as well,” Hertel said. “There is a lot happening on the East Side so we don’t want this to be exclusive to students.”

The project will have a private, gated surface parking lot and indoor and outdoor bicycle storage.

The materials from the deconstructed homes will be donated to local non-profits including Habitat for Humanity, Hertel said.

 

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