S.C. Johnson cutting up to 400 jobs globally

Cuts include Racine County positions

Racine-based S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. is planning to eliminate 300 to 400 jobs globally as part of organizational changes, the company said Wednesday.

The Frank Lloyd Wright buildings at SC Johnson’s headquarters in Racine.

“The company is healthy and our brands continue to be leaders in their categories,” Kelly Semrau, S.C. Johnson senior vice president global corporate affairs, communication and sustainability, said in a statement. “Other leading consumer packaged goods companies are doing the same as we all continue to respond to trends in the marketplace. Like them, we are doing this to maintain the company’s health and leadership.”

Texas-based Kimberly-Clark announced earlier this year it would lay off 5,000 workers as part of a restructuring plan. Those cuts included about 600 jobs at two plants in the Fox Valley area. Gov. Scott Walker has proposed giving the company incentives at the same level as Foxconn Technology Group to keep the jobs in Wisconsin.

S.C. Johnson did not indicate how many of the 400 jobs it is cutting would come from Wisconsin operations, citing its privately-held status and “out of respect of those employees who are affected.” A spokesperson did say not factory jobs are included in the cuts.

The family-owned company has around $10 billion in annual sales and employs 13,000 people globally. The company announced a $50 million to $80 million expansion of its Racine headquarters in 2015 along with the relocation of 175 employees to Chicago.

Semrau’s statement said the organizational changes were first announced in January. Some of the cuts will come from the elimination of open positions. In addition some Racine-area employees were notified Wednesday their jobs are included in the cuts.

“As always, SC Johnson intends to provide generous severance and outplacement help,” Semrau’s statement said. “We take great care in any decision affecting the people who work at the company. Decisions like this are difficult yet necessary for the continued success of the company.”

 

Racine-based S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. is planning to eliminate 300 to 400 jobs globally as part of organizational changes, the company said Wednesday.

The Frank Lloyd Wright buildings at SC Johnson’s headquarters in Racine.

“The company is healthy and our brands continue to be leaders in their categories,” Kelly Semrau, S.C. Johnson senior vice president global corporate affairs, communication and sustainability, said in a statement. “Other leading consumer packaged goods companies are doing the same as we all continue to respond to trends in the marketplace. Like them, we are doing this to maintain the company’s health and leadership.”

Texas-based Kimberly-Clark announced earlier this year it would lay off 5,000 workers as part of a restructuring plan. Those cuts included about 600 jobs at two plants in the Fox Valley area. Gov. Scott Walker has proposed giving the company incentives at the same level as Foxconn Technology Group to keep the jobs in Wisconsin.

S.C. Johnson did not indicate how many of the 400 jobs it is cutting would come from Wisconsin operations, citing its privately-held status and “out of respect of those employees who are affected.” A spokesperson did say not factory jobs are included in the cuts.

The family-owned company has around $10 billion in annual sales and employs 13,000 people globally. The company announced a $50 million to $80 million expansion of its Racine headquarters in 2015 along with the relocation of 175 employees to Chicago.

Semrau’s statement said the organizational changes were first announced in January. Some of the cuts will come from the elimination of open positions. In addition some Racine-area employees were notified Wednesday their jobs are included in the cuts.

“As always, SC Johnson intends to provide generous severance and outplacement help,” Semrau’s statement said. “We take great care in any decision affecting the people who work at the company. Decisions like this are difficult yet necessary for the continued success of the company.”

 

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