Foxconn sentiment remains unchanged among Wisconsin residents

Marquette Law School Poll shows opinions hold despite outstate development plans

The latest Marquette Law School Poll shows Wisconsin residents feel the same about Foxconn Technology Group’s planned manufacturing complex in Mount Pleasant as they did in June, before the company announced development plans in other areas of the state.

A model of the Foxconn complex, called the Wisconn Valley Science and Technology Park, in Mount Pleasant.

Of those surveyed, 46 percent said Wisconsin is paying more than the Foxconn plant is worth, flat from the June Marquette poll; 39 percent said the plant will provide at least as much value as the state is investing in it, down from 40 percent in June; and 14 percent said they did not know if it was worth the cost.

Fifty-three percent of registered voters felt the Foxconn plant would help the Milwaukee-area economy, down from 56 percent in June. Just 30 percent of Wisconsin residents thought Foxconn would boost businesses where they live, up from 29 percent in June; with 58 percent saying their local businesses will not benefit, down from 61 percent in June; and 12 percent who said they weren’t sure.

In recent weeks Foxconn has announced outstate development plans. The company announced on June 29 it would open a Green Bay innovation center with at least 200 employees. And July 16, it announced plans to create a tech hub in downtown Eau Claire with at least 150 jobs.

Respondents to the MU Law School Poll also weighed in on trade tariffs, with 24 percent indicating the steel and aluminum tariffs will improve the U.S. economy, down from 29 percent in June, and 55 percent feeling they would harm the economy, flat from June, and 21 percent unsure.

And the poll found that about one-third of the state’s registered voters are undecided about the Wisconsin primary elections next month.

In the Republican U.S. Senate primary, Leah Vukmir took the lead at 34 percent, up from 32 percent in June. Kevin Nicholson fell behind at 32 percent, down from 37 percent in June.

In the Democratic race to challenge Gov. Scott Walker in November, Tony Evers is well ahead of the pack with 31 percent, up from 25 percent in June. The next closest opponents are Mahlon Mitchell and Kathleen Vinehout, with 6 percent each, up from 4 percent and 5 percent, respectively, in June.

The poll was administered by landline and cell phone to 800 registered Wisconsin voters between July 11 and 15. The overall margin of error was +/-4.1 percent. The Foxconn questions were asked of half the sample, and had a margin of error of +/-5.9 percent.

The latest Marquette Law School Poll shows Wisconsin residents feel the same about Foxconn Technology Group’s planned manufacturing complex in Mount Pleasant as they did in June, before the company announced development plans in other areas of the state.

A model of the Foxconn complex, called the Wisconn Valley Science and Technology Park, in Mount Pleasant.

Of those surveyed, 46 percent said Wisconsin is paying more than the Foxconn plant is worth, flat from the June Marquette poll; 39 percent said the plant will provide at least as much value as the state is investing in it, down from 40 percent in June; and 14 percent said they did not know if it was worth the cost.

Fifty-three percent of registered voters felt the Foxconn plant would help the Milwaukee-area economy, down from 56 percent in June. Just 30 percent of Wisconsin residents thought Foxconn would boost businesses where they live, up from 29 percent in June; with 58 percent saying their local businesses will not benefit, down from 61 percent in June; and 12 percent who said they weren’t sure.

In recent weeks Foxconn has announced outstate development plans. The company announced on June 29 it would open a Green Bay innovation center with at least 200 employees. And July 16, it announced plans to create a tech hub in downtown Eau Claire with at least 150 jobs.

Respondents to the MU Law School Poll also weighed in on trade tariffs, with 24 percent indicating the steel and aluminum tariffs will improve the U.S. economy, down from 29 percent in June, and 55 percent feeling they would harm the economy, flat from June, and 21 percent unsure.

And the poll found that about one-third of the state’s registered voters are undecided about the Wisconsin primary elections next month.

In the Republican U.S. Senate primary, Leah Vukmir took the lead at 34 percent, up from 32 percent in June. Kevin Nicholson fell behind at 32 percent, down from 37 percent in June.

In the Democratic race to challenge Gov. Scott Walker in November, Tony Evers is well ahead of the pack with 31 percent, up from 25 percent in June. The next closest opponents are Mahlon Mitchell and Kathleen Vinehout, with 6 percent each, up from 4 percent and 5 percent, respectively, in June.

The poll was administered by landline and cell phone to 800 registered Wisconsin voters between July 11 and 15. The overall margin of error was +/-4.1 percent. The Foxconn questions were asked of half the sample, and had a margin of error of +/-5.9 percent.

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