Gorilly Goods to expand production with addition of Supernola

Evolve Brands acquires both companies

Organic snack manufacturer Gorilly Goods is set to expand production at its headquarters in Jackson, in Washington County.

A Gorilly Goods fruit and nut cluster.

The company has agreed to be acquired by newly formed health-focused snack holding company Evolve Brands LLC. As part of the deal, expected to close in February for an undisclosed price, Evolve would also acquire Harrisburg, Pennsylvania-based Supernola and consolidate both companies’ operations in Jackson.

Gorilly Goods, launched by Stephen and Chris McDiarmid in 2012, makes a line of raw, on-the-go snacks that come in both savory and sweet flavors. Among the non-GMO ingredients are fruits, nuts, seeds and greens. The products are distributed in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Iowa, Illinois, and in a few other stores nationally. Locally, they’re sold at Outpost Natural Foods, Sendik’s and Woodman’s stores.

In 2016, the McDiarmids sold 51 percent of Gorilly to Canadian company Nature’s Path, the largest organic breakfast and snack food firm in North America. But the company is now selling its stake.

“We have ceased our funding of Gorilly Goods due to the fact that we found the time and resources required to scale the company exceeded what we were willing to commit,” said Arran Stephens, founder and co-CEO of Nature’s Path. “We are pleased that Gorilly Goods has made new arrangements and that consumers can continue to enjoy their excellent products.”

As of 2016, Gorilly had nine employees at a 6,500-square-foot facility that was operating at about 25 percent of its capacity. It expected to triple its capacity in that factory with the Nature’s Path investment.

Stephen McDiarmid

Supernola makes four flavors of granola snacks containing superfoods that are certified for the Paleo diet. Its founder, Cindy Poiesz, owns Evolve Brands along with Frank Jimenez, a consumer packaged goods entrepreneur.

Supernola will be rebranded and sold at regional, national and alternative retailers along with Gorilly Goods. It will be manufactured at Gorilly’s gluten-, grain-, dairy- and peanut-free facility. Evolve will focus on marketing the brands to healthy snack consumers.

“Gorilly Goods and Supernola are a match made in heaven,” Jimenez said. “While each brand has different targeted audiences, the synergy afforded by these brands is extraordinary.”

“The Gorilly Goods and Supernola brands align perfectly with EVOLVE’s mission to actively create a better world through better food that is nutrient-dense, delicious and convenient,” Poiesz said.

Organic snack manufacturer Gorilly Goods is set to expand production at its headquarters in Jackson, in Washington County.

A Gorilly Goods fruit and nut cluster.

The company has agreed to be acquired by newly formed health-focused snack holding company Evolve Brands LLC. As part of the deal, expected to close in February for an undisclosed price, Evolve would also acquire Harrisburg, Pennsylvania-based Supernola and consolidate both companies’ operations in Jackson.

Gorilly Goods, launched by Stephen and Chris McDiarmid in 2012, makes a line of raw, on-the-go snacks that come in both savory and sweet flavors. Among the non-GMO ingredients are fruits, nuts, seeds and greens. The products are distributed in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Iowa, Illinois, and in a few other stores nationally. Locally, they’re sold at Outpost Natural Foods, Sendik’s and Woodman’s stores.

In 2016, the McDiarmids sold 51 percent of Gorilly to Canadian company Nature’s Path, the largest organic breakfast and snack food firm in North America. But the company is now selling its stake.

“We have ceased our funding of Gorilly Goods due to the fact that we found the time and resources required to scale the company exceeded what we were willing to commit,” said Arran Stephens, founder and co-CEO of Nature’s Path. “We are pleased that Gorilly Goods has made new arrangements and that consumers can continue to enjoy their excellent products.”

As of 2016, Gorilly had nine employees at a 6,500-square-foot facility that was operating at about 25 percent of its capacity. It expected to triple its capacity in that factory with the Nature’s Path investment.

Stephen McDiarmid

Supernola makes four flavors of granola snacks containing superfoods that are certified for the Paleo diet. Its founder, Cindy Poiesz, owns Evolve Brands along with Frank Jimenez, a consumer packaged goods entrepreneur.

Supernola will be rebranded and sold at regional, national and alternative retailers along with Gorilly Goods. It will be manufactured at Gorilly’s gluten-, grain-, dairy- and peanut-free facility. Evolve will focus on marketing the brands to healthy snack consumers.

“Gorilly Goods and Supernola are a match made in heaven,” Jimenez said. “While each brand has different targeted audiences, the synergy afforded by these brands is extraordinary.”

“The Gorilly Goods and Supernola brands align perfectly with EVOLVE’s mission to actively create a better world through better food that is nutrient-dense, delicious and convenient,” Poiesz said.

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