Sid Grinker buys property next door

Building was formerly occupied by Dillon Bindery

Milwaukee-based restoration business Sid Grinker, which has been making major changes to its headquarters campus in the city, has acquired the former Dillon Bindery property next door.

An affiliate of Sid Grinker purchased the 26,000-square-foot former Dillon Bindery building at 424 W. Walnut St. for $1.05 million, according to state records.

Earlier this year, Dillon Bindery was acquired by Elk Grove Village, Illinois-based Specialty Finishing Group, which shut down the Milwaukee operations.

The former Dillon Bindery building was built in 1890 and has been expanded numerous times, according to Mike Grinker, president of Sid Grinker. The building was originally used as a barn and stables for horses for the Steinmeyer grocery store in downtown Milwaukee, Grinker said.

Grinker said the company is still evaluating what to do with the former Dillon Bindery property. Some of it will be used by Sid Grinker as storage and workshop space, but other parts of it could be improved and leased to tenants, he said.

The former Dillon Bindery building becomes the fourth building on the Sid Grinker campus, located northwest of North Fourth Street and West Walnut Street.

Sid Grinker recently built a new, 5,600-square-foot building at 406 Walnut St. The company occupies 2,000 square feet in the building and leases the rest of Sweetbush LLC, a plant rental service.

Sid Grinker currently has its offices in the 5,000-square-foot building at 416 W. Walnut. The company is refurbishing the 3,000-square-foot building at 1719 N. Fourth St. and will then move its offices into that building. Then it will make improvements to the 416 W. Walnut building, with plans to occupy some of that space and lease the rest out.

All told, the company is making a significant investment in its near north side neighborhood.

“We are doubling down in the neighborhood,” Grinker said.

Milwaukee-based restoration business Sid Grinker, which has been making major changes to its headquarters campus in the city, has acquired the former Dillon Bindery property next door.

An affiliate of Sid Grinker purchased the 26,000-square-foot former Dillon Bindery building at 424 W. Walnut St. for $1.05 million, according to state records.

Earlier this year, Dillon Bindery was acquired by Elk Grove Village, Illinois-based Specialty Finishing Group, which shut down the Milwaukee operations.

The former Dillon Bindery building was built in 1890 and has been expanded numerous times, according to Mike Grinker, president of Sid Grinker. The building was originally used as a barn and stables for horses for the Steinmeyer grocery store in downtown Milwaukee, Grinker said.

Grinker said the company is still evaluating what to do with the former Dillon Bindery property. Some of it will be used by Sid Grinker as storage and workshop space, but other parts of it could be improved and leased to tenants, he said.

The former Dillon Bindery building becomes the fourth building on the Sid Grinker campus, located northwest of North Fourth Street and West Walnut Street.

Sid Grinker recently built a new, 5,600-square-foot building at 406 Walnut St. The company occupies 2,000 square feet in the building and leases the rest of Sweetbush LLC, a plant rental service.

Sid Grinker currently has its offices in the 5,000-square-foot building at 416 W. Walnut. The company is refurbishing the 3,000-square-foot building at 1719 N. Fourth St. and will then move its offices into that building. Then it will make improvements to the 416 W. Walnut building, with plans to occupy some of that space and lease the rest out.

All told, the company is making a significant investment in its near north side neighborhood.

“We are doubling down in the neighborhood,” Grinker said.

Comments

  1. The Sheriff says:

    The same SId Grinker who used city funds to refurbish and expand their HQ and then RENT the building out? It’s like they are actually using the city funds to buy another building next door so Mike Grinker can pad a few extra bucks in his pockets and then retreat back to the suburbs.

    These cozy relationships the city continues to make are nothing but full blown corporate welfare and picking winners and losers.