Hunger Task Force Farm opens new visitor center

Housed in renovated historic grain storehouse at Franklin farm

Hunger Task Force recently celebrated the opening of its newly reconstructed volunteer and visitor center at the organization’s farm in Franklin.

The new Hunger Task Force Farm visitor center.

The organization recently renovated a historic, 2,944-square-foot grain and feed storehouse to create a volunteer and community gathering space at its farm at 9000 S. 68th Street.

The $1.3 million project was funded entirely by donors, including the Harley-Davidson Foundation, Milwaukee County Parks, DCI-Artform and the Greater Milwaukee Foundation, among others.

About 16,000 volunteers help the Hunger Task Force annually — a third of whom work on the farm, seeding, planting and harvesting produce that is transported to the organization’s Milwaukee headquarters and distributed to local food pantries.  

The new visitor center includes kiosks for volunteers to sign in to shifts, offices for farm staff, and a community gathering space. Organization staff envision the building also being used for community meetings, training and school groups.

The new visitor center includes kiosks for volunteers to sign in.

“It is a gorgeous setting, it’s a place where the community — visitors, volunteers and our donors — can come and feel incredibly welcomed,” said Sarah Anderson, farm community development officer. “We’ll be able to host special trainings and events and our volunteers will be welcomed here immediately before their shift.”

Hunger Task Force recently celebrated the opening of its newly reconstructed volunteer and visitor center at the organization’s farm in Franklin.

The new Hunger Task Force Farm visitor center.

The organization recently renovated a historic, 2,944-square-foot grain and feed storehouse to create a volunteer and community gathering space at its farm at 9000 S. 68th Street.

The $1.3 million project was funded entirely by donors, including the Harley-Davidson Foundation, Milwaukee County Parks, DCI-Artform and the Greater Milwaukee Foundation, among others.

About 16,000 volunteers help the Hunger Task Force annually — a third of whom work on the farm, seeding, planting and harvesting produce that is transported to the organization’s Milwaukee headquarters and distributed to local food pantries.  

The new visitor center includes kiosks for volunteers to sign in to shifts, offices for farm staff, and a community gathering space. Organization staff envision the building also being used for community meetings, training and school groups.

The new visitor center includes kiosks for volunteers to sign in.

“It is a gorgeous setting, it’s a place where the community — visitors, volunteers and our donors — can come and feel incredibly welcomed,” said Sarah Anderson, farm community development officer. “We’ll be able to host special trainings and events and our volunteers will be welcomed here immediately before their shift.”

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