Wisconsin 15th in manufacturing job growth, 38th overall

State added 3,000 manufacturing jobs over last 12 months

The 3,000 manufacturing jobs that Wisconsin added between March 2016 and March 2017 amounted to a 0.64 percent increase that ranked 15th in the country and second in the Midwest, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Economic indicators

The only Midwestern state to outpace Wisconsin was Ohio, which increased manufacturing employment 0.95 percent, or 6,500 jobs, and ranked 13th. Nevada and Utah led the way with a 4.17 percent and 3.83 percent increases respectively.

The state Department of Workforce Development touted the data on Friday as a sign of the manufacturing industry’s strength in the state.

“Wisconsin’s economy continues to grow under Governor Scott Walker,” DWD Secretary Ray Allen said. “(Friday’s) rankings show Wisconsin continuing to be one of the nation’s leaders in the manufacturing industry, outpacing all neighboring states and coming in at 15th in the nation for year-over-year growth rate.”

Allen also noted the state’s unemployment rate is at 3.4 percent, its lowest level since April 2000.

The department’s release did not include the state’s overall private sector job performance in the last year. Wisconsin added 22,100 private sector jobs, an increase of 0.88 percent that ranked 38th in the country.

Wisconsin’s private sector job growth ranked 8th in the Midwest trailing Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Indiana, South Dakota, Nebraska and Ohio.

Many of the state’s private sector gains were in service providing industries, which added 18,700 jobs, a 0.97 percent increase that ranked 37th in the country.

Manufacturing job growth in Wisconsin was concentrated in the nondurable goods sector, which increased by 1.08 percent or 2,000 jobs. The durable goods sector was up 0.36 percent, adding 1,000 jobs.

The data are preliminary results from a survey of roughly 3 percent of state businesses and can be subject to revisions. The Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages is generally considered a more accurate measure of job growth. The next QCEW release is scheduled for June and will cover through the end of 2016.

Read more economic data reports at the BizTracker page.

The 3,000 manufacturing jobs that Wisconsin added between March 2016 and March 2017 amounted to a 0.64 percent increase that ranked 15th in the country and second in the Midwest, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Economic indicators

The only Midwestern state to outpace Wisconsin was Ohio, which increased manufacturing employment 0.95 percent, or 6,500 jobs, and ranked 13th. Nevada and Utah led the way with a 4.17 percent and 3.83 percent increases respectively.

The state Department of Workforce Development touted the data on Friday as a sign of the manufacturing industry’s strength in the state.

“Wisconsin’s economy continues to grow under Governor Scott Walker,” DWD Secretary Ray Allen said. “(Friday’s) rankings show Wisconsin continuing to be one of the nation’s leaders in the manufacturing industry, outpacing all neighboring states and coming in at 15th in the nation for year-over-year growth rate.”

Allen also noted the state’s unemployment rate is at 3.4 percent, its lowest level since April 2000.

The department’s release did not include the state’s overall private sector job performance in the last year. Wisconsin added 22,100 private sector jobs, an increase of 0.88 percent that ranked 38th in the country.

Wisconsin’s private sector job growth ranked 8th in the Midwest trailing Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Indiana, South Dakota, Nebraska and Ohio.

Many of the state’s private sector gains were in service providing industries, which added 18,700 jobs, a 0.97 percent increase that ranked 37th in the country.

Manufacturing job growth in Wisconsin was concentrated in the nondurable goods sector, which increased by 1.08 percent or 2,000 jobs. The durable goods sector was up 0.36 percent, adding 1,000 jobs.

The data are preliminary results from a survey of roughly 3 percent of state businesses and can be subject to revisions. The Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages is generally considered a more accurate measure of job growth. The next QCEW release is scheduled for June and will cover through the end of 2016.

Read more economic data reports at the BizTracker page.

Comments

  1. Doug says:

    38th. And 80% of that was in the Service sector? Yep. It’s still working.