Northwestern Mutual Foundation gives $600,000 to childhood cancer research

Will support four scientists' research

Northwestern Mutual Foundation is funding four grants totaling $600,000 in support of childhood cancer research. 

The foundation is giving $150,000 grants to four scientists through Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation’s Young Investigator program, which supports scientists who are early in their careers and are working to find better treatments and cures for childhood cancer.

The four grant recipients include:

  • Cecile Roleau, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, whose work will study brain tumor cancer that can lead to finding designated safe therapies to block the tumor.
  • Steven Jonas, of University of California-Los Angeles, whose research examines how harnessing the power of patients’ immune systems can aid in the battle against cancer.
  • Sakshi Uppal, of University of Chicago, whose work will study how a low oxygen environment can contribute to tumor resistance and aggressive growth.
  • Beau Webber, of University of Minnesota-Minneapolis, whose research focuses on Osteosarcoma, the most common cancer of the bone in children and adolescents.

“We believe that these grants will help young scientists unlock new tools for discovering a cure for cancer,” said Eric Christophersen, president of the Northwestern Mutual Foundation. “A brighter tomorrow for families enduring childhood cancer starts with a key finding by any of these deserving four grant recipients that are on their journey to make a difference in medical research.”

Northwestern Mutual is also sponsoring the fifth annual ALSF Young Investigator Summit in Los Angeles, where more than 40 young scientists will present their research this fall.

Northwestern Mutual Foundation is funding four grants totaling $600,000 in support of childhood cancer research. 

The foundation is giving $150,000 grants to four scientists through Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation’s Young Investigator program, which supports scientists who are early in their careers and are working to find better treatments and cures for childhood cancer.

The four grant recipients include:

  • Cecile Roleau, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, whose work will study brain tumor cancer that can lead to finding designated safe therapies to block the tumor.
  • Steven Jonas, of University of California-Los Angeles, whose research examines how harnessing the power of patients’ immune systems can aid in the battle against cancer.
  • Sakshi Uppal, of University of Chicago, whose work will study how a low oxygen environment can contribute to tumor resistance and aggressive growth.
  • Beau Webber, of University of Minnesota-Minneapolis, whose research focuses on Osteosarcoma, the most common cancer of the bone in children and adolescents.

“We believe that these grants will help young scientists unlock new tools for discovering a cure for cancer,” said Eric Christophersen, president of the Northwestern Mutual Foundation. “A brighter tomorrow for families enduring childhood cancer starts with a key finding by any of these deserving four grant recipients that are on their journey to make a difference in medical research.”

Northwestern Mutual is also sponsoring the fifth annual ALSF Young Investigator Summit in Los Angeles, where more than 40 young scientists will present their research this fall.

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