Rare Steakhouse

BizLunch

Madison-based Noble Chef Hospitality opened its first Milwaukee restaurant, Rare Steakhouse, last June on the ground floor of Irgens’ 17-story office tower at 833 E. Michigan St. in downtown Milwaukee.

Noble president and CEO Jack Sosnowski wanted to create an experience for guests, and he started with wine. Rare has more than 1,000 types on hand in its cellar.

For food-focused guests who want a quick lunch, the normal menu offers many options. And for those who want to linger longer, a hand-carved prime rib cart rolls through the restaurant daily.

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The kitchen staff ensures each cut of meat is served exactly right, whether diners prefer it rare or well done. And steaks are dry aged in a state-of-the-art dry-aging room located below the restaurant for several weeks to enhance the taste.

  1. An 8-ounce filet mignon being seasoned in the Rare kitchen. To season the meat, the Rare culinary team keeps it simple and uses kosher salt and ground black pepper.
  2. To cook the steaks, the Rare team uses a Montague broiler that’s set at 1,800 degrees.
  3. Most of the restaurant’s vegetables come from V. Marchese Inc. in Milwaukee.
  4. A member of Rare’s culinary staff prepares a meal. Lunch entrees range from $19 for pan-seared Scottish salmon to $62 for a 22-ounce, dry-aged prime bone-in ribeye. A 28-ounce wet-aged double bone-in Frenched filet for $120 is on the menu for dinner. Rare also serves Wagyu or Kobe beef. During dinner, guests can choose three types, including a 34-ounce domestic A3 Tomahawk for $120 or a 5-ounce Japanese A5 Mishima Strip Loin for $135.
  5. Rare’s dry-aging room, located below the restaurant. The meat is dry-aged to perfection for 38 to 40 days.

Madison-based Noble Chef Hospitality opened its first Milwaukee restaurant, Rare Steakhouse, last June on the ground floor of Irgens’ 17-story office tower at 833 E. Michigan St. in downtown Milwaukee.

Noble president and CEO Jack Sosnowski wanted to create an experience for guests, and he started with wine. Rare has more than 1,000 types on hand in its cellar.

For food-focused guests who want a quick lunch, the normal menu offers many options. And for those who want to linger longer, a hand-carved prime rib cart rolls through the restaurant daily.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The kitchen staff ensures each cut of meat is served exactly right, whether diners prefer it rare or well done. And steaks are dry aged in a state-of-the-art dry-aging room located below the restaurant for several weeks to enhance the taste.

  1. An 8-ounce filet mignon being seasoned in the Rare kitchen. To season the meat, the Rare culinary team keeps it simple and uses kosher salt and ground black pepper.
  2. To cook the steaks, the Rare team uses a Montague broiler that’s set at 1,800 degrees.
  3. Most of the restaurant’s vegetables come from V. Marchese Inc. in Milwaukee.
  4. A member of Rare’s culinary staff prepares a meal. Lunch entrees range from $19 for pan-seared Scottish salmon to $62 for a 22-ounce, dry-aged prime bone-in ribeye. A 28-ounce wet-aged double bone-in Frenched filet for $120 is on the menu for dinner. Rare also serves Wagyu or Kobe beef. During dinner, guests can choose three types, including a 34-ounce domestic A3 Tomahawk for $120 or a 5-ounce Japanese A5 Mishima Strip Loin for $135.
  5. Rare’s dry-aging room, located below the restaurant. The meat is dry-aged to perfection for 38 to 40 days.

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